Tag Archives: Résumé

Don’t make these common resume mistakes

Poor grammar, spelling mistakes, too many pages long…recruiters have seen many resume mistakes. Make sure your resume is polished and ready so you can get that interview! Hiring Managers have been known to spend only 6 seconds looking at your resume. Not getting any call backs from your job applications and resume submissions? Perhaps it is time to review your resume, and make sure it is clear and concise.

Here is a short video on 9 common mistakes people make on their resumes.

video credit: Business Insider

Why the best hire might not have the perfect resume

At a quick glance at a resume, hiring managers can easily be too quick to judge to determine if the candidate deserves an interview.

In this TED Talk video below, HR Manager Regina Hartley shares with us why highly motivated ‘scrappers’ are the kind of candidates hiring managers should be looking out for. Scrappers have experienced hardships and overcome adversity which has shaped them to be highly motivated, productive and successful.

Top McNak blog posts of 2014

Happy new year 2015 written with Sparkling figures

.

Reflecting back on the past year, here is a quick snapshot of our three most read blog articles for 2014:

.

For your HR toolbox…8 Behavioural Questions You’re Not Asking

A solid perspective from one of our top recruiters, Alana Savage on…Your resume vs. Your LinkedIn Profile

Results (and some photos) from our annual wine auction…GrapeJuice Raises $87,000 for Big Sisters… we’re looking forward to the March 5th, 2015 event!

We’d like take this opportunity to thank you all for taking the time to read, comment and share our articles on the McNak blog.  Happy New Year!

 

Resume Blunders

STOPYour resume is often the first impression you can make at a company – make it a good one so hopefully it isn’t the ONLY impression you get to make. As a recruiter I have seen all sorts of resumes from various countries and the formats can change frequently.  Saying this, there are some resume blunders that no one can afford to make. Here are just a few of the resume mistakes I have seen.

  • An applicant submitted the resume with a cover letter addressed to another company for a very different role.
  • A woman included a photograph that was shoulders up, wearing a strapless shirt – it looked like she was baring it all!
  • No contact information was included. Talk about making it hard for someone to reach you!
  • A candidate described themselves as “detail oriented” but the resume was littered with careless errors.
  • A candidate listed her e-mail address as HOTMILF@*****.com

Avoid these blunders, and you will have a chance at making a good, professional first impression.

Alana Savage is a Recruitment Consultant at McNeill Nakamoto Recruitment Group, specializing in full-cycle recruitment and client relations within Investment and Financial Services.  Alana handles the entire recruitment process for her clients including identifying position requirements, developing job postings, sourcing and interviewing of candidates, checking references, negotiating job offers and onboarding support.

Your resume vs. Your LinkedIn Profile

iStock_000021621315LargeJobseekers often ask if a resume is still really necessary when we have a tool like LinkedIn at our fingertips.

Resumes are definitely not dead – with a few industry exceptions, you can’t get a job without one.  Saying this, the resume is not what gets someone hired anymore. Who you know, or get to know is very important, and your resume allows you to go through the formal HR process which is most often still required.

As for the immediate future of resumes, I think we’ll see some creative changes to the resume, streamlining the content so it is quicker to learn about someone’s professional background. I think the three page resume has already gone out but maybe the two page will follow and be replaced by some format that showcases your real personality rather than some cliche “interests” at the bottom. Video resumes are gaining attention, Q+A’s online, as well as assignments before a first interview. All of these processes are tools used to get to know the person and their abilities.

Looking long term, the future of resumes would probably depend on where technology goes. I could see resumes being changed by new format options, and perhaps being replaced altogether.

LinkedIn absolutely compliments a resume but I think if it was going to replace it, then it would be happening right now, and it doesn’t for most HR processes. You can really make an impact with LinkedIn – maintaining a professional and up to date profile is absolutely necessary.  But to really use LinkedIn to your advantage – create content so you set yourself apart from your peers and are viewed as a specialist in your field. You can use LinkedIn to connect with companies/people of interest to get that job interview, then to research hiring managers and team members before meeting them in person.

Consider both resumes and LinkedIn as essential career tools. Consider LinkedIn as your living resume.

Crafting the Perfect Resume

Writing your resume is about showing yourself in the best light. This informative infographic put together by Colorado Technical University gives tips on fonts and typefaces to make it easier for the recipient to read on a computer screen, as well as other advice for the traditional paper resume.

Paying attention to these basic elements and more can make all the difference in having a resume that gets noticed.

click on the image for a larger view

infographic_modern_resume

source: Colorado Technical University

Job Seeker Safety 101

wagner51's own temporary SIN card, scanned and...

Image via Wikipedia

So, you’ve uploaded your resume to various job board websites, created online social media profiles for all industry leaders to see, and applied to every opportunity that interests you.  You’ve managed to be accessible to almost all the employers out there.  “This must lead to a new job!”, you might think.  That might not be all it leads to….

Not only have you made your work history and educational background available to hiring managers, you’ve made your personal information readily available to scammers.  On the surface, it looks like you are just going through the common job search process.  Fact is, potential employers only really need your name and phone number or e-mail address to be able to contact you.  Providing them with your street address, apartment number, and worse – Social Insurance Number is just plain dangerous.

As a recruiter with McNeill Nakamoto, I view countless resumes online and a surprising number of them have personal information included that makes identity theft too easy for criminals posing as potential employers.  Scammers have been known to simply use the information you provided on your resume or online profile to access your banking information, make duplicate government documents, and much more.

There are more complex tactics that every job seeker should be aware of… Some con-artists pose as hiring managers and email applicants who submit their resumes to legitimate job postings.  By hacking into a hiring manager’s email account, they can respond to applicants – confirming that they have won the position, and then ask the unsuspecting candidates to provide personal information, government ID numbers and banking information.  Read This! Job Seeker Identities at Risk

Moral of the story – Think twice before sharing personal information online.

~ Alana Savage