Tag Archives: technology

Do You Find it Hard to Unplug During Your Vacation?

Tis the festive season… when we start to wind down, and spend time with friends and family.  It is a pleasure to take time away from the office and unwind, whether we choose to have a stay-cation, or get away from winter and travel further afield.  But do we really do that? Do we really get away from it all? Technology has allowed us to take our office with us.  The impact of technology on our lives, at home and at work, can’t be understated. Work-life balance is very individualized. People are adapting and integrating technology in ways that work for them. So, the question is…

 

Millenials in the Workplace

Managing and motivating millenials in the workplace can leave some older generations with many questions. What makes them tick? What leadership style do they respond to? What are their core values in life? What keeps them engaged at work? As we get to know this youngest generation of workers, here’s a video interview with Simon Sinek below that sheds some light how millenials are perceived in the workplace, how they conduct their lives, and what corporations need to do to shape workplaces for the future.

Using Technology During a Disaster

400-2015-enEmergency Preparedness Week  is an annual event that takes place each year during the first full week of May.

Are you prepared for an emergency? What about your office? Your staff? Here is some useful information you can share with your work colleagues from www.GetPrepared.ca about using technology during a disaster.

We rely on technology more and more to keep in touch with our family, friends, and colleagues with a click of a button. But what happens in the event of a major emergency? Suddenly these tools can become vital in helping you and your family deal get in touch and stay informed. So here are some tips on the use of technology in an emergency:

  • If possible, use non-voice channels like text messaging, email or social media. These use less bandwidth than voice communications and may work even when phone service doesn’t.
  • If you must use a phone, keep your conversation brief and convey only vital information to emergency personnel and/or family. This will also conserve your phone’s battery.
  • Unable to complete a call? Wait 10 seconds before redialing to help reduce network congestion. Note, cordless phones rely on electricity and will not work during a power outage. If you have a landline, keep at least one corded phone in your home.
  • Keep extra batteries or a charger for your mobile device in your emergency kit. Consider getting a solar-powered, crank, or vehicle phone charger. If you don’t have a cell phone, keep a prepaid phone card in your emergency kit.
  • Keep your contacts up to date on your phone, email and other channels. This will make it easier to reach important contacts, such as friends, family, neighbours, child’s school, or insurance agent.
  • If you have a smartphone, save your safe meeting location(s) on its mapping application.
  • Conserve your smartphone’s battery by reducing the screen’s brightness, placing your phone in airplane mode, and closing apps you are not using. You never know how long a power outage will last!

Remember, in an emergency or to save a life, call 9-1-1 for help. You cannot currently text 9-1-1. If you are not experiencing an emergency, do not call 9-1-1. If your area offers 3-1-1 service or another information system, call that number for non-emergencies.

Do You Find it Hard to Unplug During Your Vacation?

laptop on beach

During these glorious warm summer months, and long days of light, it is a pleasure to take time away from the office and unwind. But do we really do that? Do we really get away from it all? Technology has allowed us to take our office with us.  The impact of technology on our lives, at home and at work, can’t be understated. Work-life balance is very individualized. People are adapting and integrating technology in ways that work for them. So, the question is…

photo credit: marylkayoe

A Digital Cleanse

I’m taking a little bit of time off this summer to spend time with our family and extended family.  We want to spend quality time together and limit the amount of time we spend with our digital devices.  We’ve set some rules in place for  adults and children for a 2 week time period:

No – Facebook, texting, email, movies, video games
Yes – landline phone, radio, reading lights, ‘IRL’, flashlight tag, Monopoly
.

I posted the challenge and rules on Facebook prior to the cleanse. Lots of comments followed. One friend wrote: “Such a great idea. Wish we could join you! We need a break from the insanity.” Another said, “A bold move. Enjoy!”

You may want to give it a try, if only for a day or two. If nothing else, consider just how attached you’ve become to these online services and ‘screen time’. A few summers ago I took a week-long vacation on a sailboat. We were far from any cell service and internet connection. It was exhilarating.

So, my question to you is, would you like to take a break from the insanity? Could you make the bold move and take a digital cleanse?

photo: GSAndré

Don’t hide behind email

Many years ago, my grandmother asked me to explain “email” to her. Some of her younger friends were pestering her to get an email account so she could receive info about group meetings, bingo nights, etc. I dutifully explained to her that email was short for electronic mail and is a quick, easy, efficient way to send and receive messages. It was used for both work and personal messages. I boastfully bragged that I could sit at my desk all day long and not have to engage anyone face to face or on the phone. It was great! “Hmmmmmmmm,” she muttered, “sounds kind of lonely to me.” Whatever, I thought to myself.

Fast forward ten years and I have a resolution for 2011. No, I am not giving up on email or even reducing my use of it. My resolution is: I will try my best to avoid using email if I have to communicate disappointing or bad news to a client, prospect, candidate, colleague, or business partner. I will have the courage to pick up the phone or engage the person face to face. Why this resolution? Because I have been on the receiving end of these types of emails and not only am I sad about the communicated news, but I find myself disappointed that the person is hiding behind the non-confrontational nature of email. I may have some follow-up questions, I may want to express my frustration, I may want to ask why or how questions.

I realize my resolution is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to some of the negative aspects regarding our society’s ubiquitous use of technology; but it’s one small thing that irritates me and I want to change my behavior. I’m curious, do you sometimes hide behind email when you have to deliver bad news?

Happy New Year!

P.S. My other resolution for 2011 is to use more idioms in my daily interactions. Some of my favorites include: dime a dozen, sink a battleship, swing a dead cat, a blessing in disguise, blue moon, long in the tooth, pass the buck, slow as molasses in January, and three sheets to the wind.